The worrying and sudden rise in Covid cases in Spain

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The worrying and sudden rise in Covid cases in Spain

The cumulative incidence is skyrocketing and the daily report from the Ministry of Health is adding new cases to the global curve every day with 9% of PCR positive and yesterday alone 618 cases and 2 deaths. In recent weeks the positivity rate in the Valencia Region has been around 2 and 3%, but in less than 15 days the rate has risen to 8.82%, the second highest in Spain only surpassed by Andalusia with 8.87%. The national average is 6.2%, after the accumulated  incidence over the last few days has rebounded to above one hundred cases per 100,000 inhabitants again. In the city of Valencia, the number of cases has reached a peak of 187 per 100,000. 
Fortunately, the number of hospitalizations does not follow this curve, but it is rising slightly.

 

Young people: the primary victims

 

The incidence among Valencians aged 20 to 29 is 244 cases per 100,000 inhabitants. Some regions present a much more worrying situation, such as Cantabria, with an incidence of 637 cases in this age group; Rioja (489), Catalonia (404) and Andalusia (346) also present worrying data. The delta variant, found in most regions, is of concern because of its high level of transmissibility and doubts about its ability to escape the effect of vaccines: but according to health officials, people who have received both doses are protected against delta, while those who have received only one dose are more vulnerable. 
Meanwhile, the vaccination campaign continues, and next week people aged between 30 and 39 will be invited to receive their first dose.

 

Backtracking on British tourists

 

With figures on the rise in Spain and the Delta variant on the rise in England, Madrid has finally decided to reverse its decision to let British tourists (i.e. what they account for in millions of euros in the national economy) in without vaccines or PCR: so, from now on, British travellers will have to do as all Europeans do and either be vaccinated or present a negative test less than 72 hours old. This boon to British tourists had no doubt served as a lure for some, but in the end, even if their tickets are already taken, they will have to comply with this constraint, in addition to a strict quarantine on their return.
This backlash from a virus that was thought to be more or less under control risks compromising the tourist season even more seriously and could force the public authorities to return to restrictive measures: some that are still in force in various regions are being maintained and extended for 2 more weeks. 

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